The State of Education for Males of Color - Articles

  • Experts: ‘Opportunity Gap’ Key Impediment to Black Male Academic Achievement: What if the academic achievement problems with young Black males were not actually a problem with the students themselves, but a problem with those charged with educating them? Wriiten by Autumn A. Arnett for Diverse Education online.
  • Increasing the Retention of Black Males at The University of Toledo: Nationwide, the number of African American males who graduate from college is remarkably low. Work to improve retention among minority men at The University of Toledo, as advisor of Student African American Brotherhood (SAAB), Creating an effective leadership model and addressing the specific needs of this population has been essential to improving student satisfaction and integration to the university community at The University of Toledo. Read more . . .

  • When Black Men Succeed: The litany of bad news about the status of black men in higher education is by now familiar. They make up barely 4 percent of all undergraduate students, the same proportion as in 1976. They come into college less prepared than their peers for the rigors of college-level academic work. Their completion rates are the lowest of all major racial and ethnic groups in the U.S.

  • From the Hood to Being Hooded: A Case Study of a Black Male PhD: A case study of a mathematically successful Black male named Rob, comes from a larger study involving 23 Black college students who had successfully negotiated the mathematics pipeline. Rob had recently obtained a PhD in applied mathematics, one of approximately seven Black Americans to do so in the year of his graduation. We highlight Rob’s story in order to investigate the question- what does it mean to be a Black male in the context of mathematics learning and participation?

  • K-16 and Beyond: African American Male Student Engagement in STEM Disciplines: The Journal of African American Males in Education (JAAME) explores the intelligent ―everyday practices that African American male students from elementary through doctoral study bring to the classroom and how these relate generatively to learning and thinking in STEM, specifically in science and mathematics.

  • For men of color, high academic motivation does not bring academic success: Despite higher levels of engagement in the community college experience—from rarely skipping classes to accessing tutoring services more frequently—male students of color have lower academic outcomes than White male students who are significantly less engaged, according to a recent University of Texas at Austin report.

  • The Rising Cost of Not Going to College: For those who question the value of college in this era of soaring student debt and high unemployment, the attitudes and experiences of today’s young adults—members of the so-called Millennial generation—provide a compelling answer. 

  • Yes, You Can: Homeless Boy Gets a Scholarship to Harvard: The story of David Boone reads like a movie.  He was homeless through high school, sleeping in parks, staying with friends and being caught up in unnecessary beefs with local gangs. Working through all of this, David found his way to Harvard University.

  • African-American Males in Policy Spotlight: In U.S. public schools, African American males are the least likely to read on grade level, most likely to be suspended or expelled, and most likely to drop out, numerous studies have shown.

  • The Scars of Stop-and-FriskLast year, police officers in New York City stopped and frisked people 685,724 times. Eighty-seven percent of those searches involved blacks or Latinos, many of them young men, according to the New York Civil Liberties Union. 

  • African-American Male Teacher A Vanishing Phenomenon, Experts Say: In an article published April 26, 2012 by WDSU Television in New Orleans finds Michael Booker, principal at Lake Area High College Prep in New Orleans, is a rare breed. 

  • Study shows fatherless boys more prone to delinquency: A study carried out by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne found adolescent boys who have a father figure in their lives are significantly less likely to engage in delinquent behavior than their peers with no father in their lives.

  • Black Males Hit Extra Hard By Unemployment: The country's spiraling unemployment rate is taking a particular toll on men as the recession continues to roil male-dominated industries, such as manufacturing and construction. This "he-cession," as it's sometimes called, has hit African-American men especially hard, increasing their unemployment rate to more than 17 percent last month.

  • Study: Young Black & Hispanic men likely to end up jobless, imprisoned or dead: Fifty-one percent of Hispanic male high school graduates ages 15-24 and 45 percent of African-American males in that category will end up unemployed, incarcerated or dead, according to a study issued this week by the College Board’s Advocacy & Policy Center.

  • Male Students of Color From Different Backgrounds Face Similar Hurdles: "They come from different cultural backgrounds, but male students of color, of any race, often face the same challenges in college. "

  • Reports: More Black, Latino Men Must Get Degrees: Black and Latino men continue to lag behind white and Asian men when it comes to educational attainment, according to reports released Monday by the College Board Advocacy & Policy Center and Harvard University’s W.E.B. DuBois  Institute for African and African-American Research.

  • Boys of color front and center in Philly educators gathering: 300 education leaders gathered in the City of Brotherly Love to seek knowledge, share experiences, and collaborate on how to change educational outcomes for males of color. The Knight-funded 5th Annual Gathering of Leaders, hosted by the Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color (COSEBOC), is designed for leaders to connect, share and learn.

  • Education: 5 Things College Students do to Ruin their Lives: As a college professor for the past 16 years, I've noticed two things about college: It can be a place to make your dreams come true, and it can also be a breeding ground for your worst nightmares.

  • The Odds Are Against Them: The Black Male Education Debacle - Eighth-graders Ishmere McKinney and Malcolm Tariq are among hundreds of young black males who crowd the hallways on their way to class at Savannah's DeRenne Middle School.

  • Head Count - Redefining Admissions ‘Success’ for Black Males (from The Chronicle of Higher Education) Hunt Valley, Md. - Forget “access” and “admission.” High school counselors and admissions officers should think in terms of “completion” and “attainment” when dealing with students, especially black males and other underrepresented students.